Webinars on Photoplethysmography

A webinar series exploring the latest developments in the field of photoplethysmography.

Image credit: P. Charlton

Photoplethysmography is widely used for physiological monitoring in clinical and consumer devices. It is a highly active area of research, with many important developments being made each year. In 2022 we will hold monthly webinars to showcase the latest research and thinking on key topics within the field of photoplethysmography. Each webinar will consist of a series of talks from leaders in the field. All are welcome to attend.


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Upcoming Webinars

Photoplethysmography signal processing

9 June 2022, 14:00 British Summer Time (other time zones)

Hosted by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

Overview:

The photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal contains a wealth of information. However, there are several challenges to extracting physiological measurements from the PPG. Firstly, the PPG is highly susceptible to noise, which can corrupt the information in the signal. Consequently, much research has focused on assessing PPG signal quality and reducing motion artifact. Secondly, the PPG is often only indirectly affected by the physiology of interest, making it a challenge to extract physiological measurements such as blood pressure. This webinar will feature talks from researchers in the field of PPG signal processing, providing an overview of current work in the field and future research directions.

Speakers:

  • Xiaorong Ding (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) will present on Exploiting Photoplethysmogram Features for Cuffless Blood Pressure Estimation.
  • Serena Zanelli (Paris Sorbonne Nord University) will present on Deep learning approach to detect signal quality from clinical to non-clinical PPG devices (accompanying paper).

Developments in Photoplethysmography

7 July 2022, 14:00 British Summer Time (other time zones)

Hosted by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

Overview:

Photoplethysmography is an optical sensing technique that is widely used in clinical and consumer devices. It is a highly active area of research, with many important developments being made each year. In this webinar leaders in the field will present their latest research. Topics include extracting measurements of pulse rate variability from the photoplethysmogram (PPG) for applications such as stress monitoring, and using phantoms to investigate the origins of the PPG and develop new PPG sensing technologies.

Speakers:

  • James May (City, University of London) will present on Phantoms for In Vitro Investigations of PPG and PPG technology Development.
  • Elisa Mejia-Mejia (City, University of London) will present on Photoplethysmography-based pulse rate variability: standardisation of the technique using simulated signals.
  • James Anibal (University of Oxford) will present on Attention methods for longer PPG sequences.

Previous Webinars

Webinar 1: Simulating photoplethysmography signals

Webinar 1: Simulating photoplethysmography signals

27 January 2022, 14:00 GMT (other time zones)

Hosted by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

Overview:

Several techniques have recently been developed to simulate photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals, providing data with which to develop PPG signal processing algorithms, and providing insight into the physiological origins of the signal. This webinar will feature talks from researchers who have developed complementary techniques to simulate PPG signals. It will provide a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art, and highlight pressing directions for future research.

Speakers:

  • Andrius Solosenko (Kaunas University of Technology) presented on modelling photoplethysmogram signals during atrial fibrillation.
  • Cheng Ding (Emory University) presented a novel approach to simulating PPG signals using generative adversarial networks.
  • Dr Jordi Alastruey-Arimon (King’s College London) presented on the role of in silico pulse wave databases in machine learning-based pulse wave analysis.

Webinar 2: Recent Advances in Photoplethysmography

Webinar 2: Recent Advances in Photoplethysmography

3 March 2022, 14:00 GMT (other time zones)

Hosted by Physiological Measurement

Overview:

Photoplethysmography is a non-invasive, optical measurement technique which is widely used for health monitoring. Much research focuses on how to leverage the wealth of information in the photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal, and how to use this information to inform clinical decisions. This webinar will feature talks from leaders in the field, on topics ranging from using photoplethysmography for cardiovascular risk assessment, for cuff-less blood pressure monitoring, and validating these technologies for clinical use. It will provide insight into the state-of-the-art and key directions for future research.

Speakers:

Webinar 3: Clinical applications of photoplethysmography

Clinical applications of photoplethysmography

28 April 2022, 14:00 British Summer Time (other time zones)

Hosted by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

Overview:

This webinar highlighted emerging clinical applications of photoplethysmography. Photoplethysmography has traditionally been used in pulse oximeters for oxygen saturation and heart rate monitoring. Recently, several additional clinical applications have been proposed, ranging from screening newborn infants for critical congenital heart disease, to sleep apnea assessment, to identifying atrial fibrillation in everyday life. This webinar featured talks from researchers who are pushing the boundaries of photoplethysmography, developing approaches to use it to enhance healthcare in a range of settings.

Speakers:

  • John Allen (Coventry University) presented on Further explorations in photoplethysmography for the detection of occlusive peripheral arterial disease.
  • Panicos Kyriacou (City University of London) presented on Non-invasive optical monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Traumatic Brain Injury patients.


We want your input

If you would like to present at a webinar then please email Peter Charlton:

If you would like to see your favourite PPG topics (and speakers) included in the webinar series, then please give your suggestions in this anonymous form:


Peter Charlton
Peter Charlton
Research Fellow

Biomedical Engineer specialising in signal processing for wearables.

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